Success Stories for CEC’s Annual Budget Book

 I

Success Stories for CEC's Annual
Budget Book


Hi, everyone!

It's time for us here at CEC to begin preparing our FY '05 Budget Book.  CEC's annual Budget Book, officially known as the "Federal Outlook for Exceptional Children," is an education tool that our members use with their members of Congress and staff from a variety of federal agencies.  It is divided into two sections: the first provides an overview of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the support programs, including both a legislative and fiscal history; second, we provide an overview of the Javits Gifted and Talented Program.  Woven throughout these sections are success stories and photos of students participating in special education, early intervention, and gifted education programs across the country.

Many of you remember my requests from past years for special education, early intervention, and gifted/talented success stories, and have been wonderful in sharing your stories with me. Thank you for your past help!!!  But we need your help each year, to make each Budget Book better than the last!!

You've asked us for guidelines on what the success stories should look like, and what they should include.  One way to get an idea of the types of stories we use is to look at past issues of the Budget Book.  You'll notice that the stories are relatively short (several paragraphs at most). They include the student's full name, age, city and state in which they live; and their school/district.  The stories show the benefits these students have received under IDEA or the Javits Gifted and Talented Students Act, regardless of their placement or services they have received.

In addition to stories under Javits or IDEA Part B, Part C, and Section 619, we also need to focus on the IDEA Part D support programs.  Although Congress has consistently acknowledged the importance of IDEA Part B by appropriating increasing funding amounts each year, the same cannot be said for Part D programs.  We need success stories that show the benefits of these programs!!!  PTI centers, Assistive Technology programs, etc. are wonderful programs that we need to focus attention on.  Please take a look at the FY 2003 and 2004 Budget Book for examples of these programs.  If you (or someone you know) are working on a program that's funded under Part D, please let us know.  We'd love to help you write a story (or use your story!) about it.

The Bush Administration has consistently targeted the Javits Act for elimination, since it receives so little funding. Although Congress has provided level funding for these programs over the past few years, it is critical that we provide our policymakers with concrete evidence that the programs under the Javits Act are valuable, necessary, and need to be supported with additional funds in FY '05.
 
In addition to a story, an accompanying photo of the student (and/or your classroom or project funded under Part D) would be wonderful (we'd need you to obtain a photo release form signed by a parent if a photo of the student is provided ?? just send me an e?mail at "[email protected]" and I will send you a copy(ies) as needed).  We'd love for these photos to show action; that is, to show the child(ren) in educational or early intervention settings, with their teacher(s), other children, etc.  We're looking for "head shots" only as a last resort.  The best format for the photos is a  *.tif files at high resolution (600 dpi).

Even if you don't have a success story to share, we need photos of students from all races, backgrounds, and with all types of disabilities, to include in the Budget Book – both on the cover, and throughout the Book.  If you have a photo of a student(s) you'd like us to include, please let me know by e-mailing me at the address above.  Please remember that the best photo format is a high-resolution *tif file.

We want to be ready to print each year's Budget Book soon after the President releases his proposed budget in early February, so we need appropriate success stories NOW!  Please see the attached templates on which you can model your stories.  There's a template for IDEA Parts B and C and gifted/talented programs, and an example of a program success story for Part D of IDEA.

Our goal is to make special education, early intervention, and gifted/talented education real – to put actual faces and names to the population known as "students with exceptionalities."  Many legislators have told us that our CEC Budget Book has allowed them to see what special education, early intervention, and gifted/talented education is really all about, and we'd like to continue that education process.

Let me know if you have any questions.  As always, we appreciate your help in obtaining these success stories, as we're finding they're an integral part of the Budget Book.  You could either e?mail the stories to me at [email protected], or send them to me through snail mail at: Jacki Bootel, The Council for Exceptional Children, Suite 300, 11110 North Glebe Road, Arlington, VA  22201-5704.  My phone number is 800/224?6830, ext. 437; FAX is 703/264?1637. 

Thank you in advance for your help.

Jacki Bootel
CEC's Public Policy Unit
 

Template for Success Stories for
CEC's Annual Budget Book
IDEA Parts B and C; Gifted/Talented Programs

FIRST PARAGRAPH – Should contain the student's name, city/state, school and school district.  Also include his/her age, and what the student's disability is.

Example: Alianne Tracey is a sixth-grade student at the Upper Township Middle School in Petersburg, NJ.  She was diagnosed with a profound, bilateral sensorineural hearing loss at age eight months, and she began to wear amplification devices at approximately ten months.

SECOND PARAGRAPH – Provide a history of the student's education, including the age at which he/she was referred to special education, and the general types of services he/she receives(d).

Example: Alianne began her academic career as a preschooler at the Archbishop Ryan School for children with hearing impairment, in an oral-aural program.  She began kindergarten in her home school in Upper Township, where the instructional focus shifted to a total communication program.  At that time, Ali used a personal FM system (Telex TDR 5) with TCP270 receivers, which she wore at home and in school.  The system was purchased using funds under IDEA.

THIRD PARAGRAPH – Describe the challenges that he/she faced as a result of the disability(ies), and specifically what services he/she received under IDEA to help deal with those challenges.

Example: At that time, Ali's receptive language was quite delayed.  Through the efforts of her regular education teachers (one of whom held a master's degree in Deaf Education), the support of a teacher certified to teach the hearing impaired, a sign language interpreter, and a speech/language pathologist, Ali's language growth developed quickly.  Most helpful, however, was Ali's innate motivation to learn and succeed.

LAST (FEW) PARAGRAPHS – Summarize the benefits the student has received because of IDEA, and how they have helped the student become successful, both at school and in life.

Example: Alianne's program changed this year.  On October 5, 1999, Alianne received an Advanced Bionics Cochlear Implant.  She is making remarkable progress with her implant!  She continues to benefit from a full-time sign language interpreter, and she receives regular speech therapy: on a daily basis in school, and on a weekly basis at Children's Hospital in Philadelphia.  Alianne will also benefit from a classroom amplification system – provided through IDEA flow-through funds – which will be implemented at her school very soon.

Alianne has certainly benefited from all of the services that special and regular education programs have provided for her.  She is a shining example of what IDEA can do to promote success for all students!
 
 Success Stories for
CEC's Annual Budget Book
IDEA Part D


The success stories under Part D may (or may not) include information about a specific student or students, as described above.  In addition, however, the Part D stories should include information on the authorizing program that was funded through OSEP, as well as the name and number of someone to contact for more information about the program.  An example (which does not include student-specific information) follows:

Personnel Preparation Program Targets Low-Incidence Population

For the past 10 years, the State of New Hampshire has been a national leader in promoting the inclusion of students with severe disabilities into regular classes in their neighborhood schools.  However, there has never been a preservice training program for special education teachers who work to support students with low-incidence disabilities, their families, and their teachers.  The state's higher education institutions have always argued that the number of teachers needed for this population of students is so small that it wouldn't be 'cost effective' to invest in the faculty or institutional infrastructure for a program that would have a difficult time being self?supporting.

Thanks to a Personnel Preparation grant from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) in the Low?Incidence Disability category, the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire is in its second year of administering the 'Inclusion Facilitator Training Program' – a 20-credit, two-year graduate program that leads to state certification in low?incidence disabilities.  Trainees in the program include a mix of full?time graduate students and teachers working full time in the field.  The trainees take coursework related to such topics as the values and rationale for inclusion, the development of curricular and communication supports for students in regular classes, positive behavior supports, facilitating social relationships, and collaboration and systems change advocacy.

Because of increased awareness of the importance of training of this group of special education teachers, corollary efforts are now underway to restructure the state certification to reflect recent changes in the field and current best practices, and in making the program a permanent part of the offerings at the University of New Hampshire.

Without Congressional support of IDEA Part D dollars, the seed money for this program would not be available.  It is a perfect example of how federal dollars can be used to 'jumpstart' state?level programs that benefit students with disabilities and their families.

For more information about the program, contact its director, Cheryl M. Jorgensen, Ph.D., Director, Inclusion Facilitator Training Program, Institute on Disability, University of New Hampshire, 7 Leavitt Lane, Suite 101, Durham, NH 03824 or at [email protected], or 603/862?4678.


Template for Success Stories for CEC’s Annual Budget Book

IDEA Parts B and C; Gifted/Talented Programs

 

 FIRST PARAGRAPH – Should contain the student’s name, city/state, school and school district.  Also include his/her age, and what the student’s disability is.

 Example: Alianne Tracey is a sixth-grade student at the Upper Township Middle School in Petersburg, NJ.  She was diagnosed with a profound, bilateral sensorineural hearing loss at age eight months, and she began to wear amplification devices at approximately ten months.

 

 SECOND PARAGRAPH Provide a history of the student’s education, including the age at which he/she was referred to special education, and the general types of services he/she receives(d).

 Example: Alianne began her academic career as a preschooler at the Archbishop Ryan School for children with hearing impairment, in an oral-aural program.  She began kindergarten in her home school in Upper Township, where the instructional focus shifted to a total communication program.  At that time, Ali used a personal FM system (Telex TDR 5) with TCP270 receivers, which she wore at home and in school.  The system was purchased using funds under IDEA.

 

THIRD PARAGRAPH – Describe the challenges that he/she faced as a result of the disability(ies), and specifically what services he/she received under IDEA to help deal with those challenges.

 Example: At that time, Ali’s receptive language was quite delayed.  Through the efforts of her regular education teachers (one of whom held a master’s degree in Deaf Education), the support of a teacher certified to teach the hearing impaired, a sign language interpreter, and a speech/language pathologist, Ali’s language growth developed quickly.  Most helpful, however, was Ali’s innate motivation to learn and succeed.

 

LAST (FEW) PARAGRAPHS – Summarize the benefits the student has received because of IDEA, and how they have helped the student become successful, both at school and in life.

 Example: Alianne’s program changed this year.  On October 5, 1999, Alianne received an Advanced Bionics Cochlear Implant.  She is making remarkable progress with her implant!  She continues to benefit from a full-time sign language interpreter, and she receives regular speech therapy: on a daily basis in school, and on a weekly basis at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia.  Alianne will also benefit from a classroom amplification system – provided through IDEA flow-through funds – which will be implemented at her school very soon.

 Alianne has certainly benefited from all of the services that special and regular education programs have provided for her.  She is a shining example of what IDEA can do to promote success for all students!

 Success Stories for CEC’s Annual Budget Book

IDEA Part D

 The success stories under Part D may (or may not) include information about a specific student or students, as described above.  In addition, however, the Part D stories should include information on the authorizing program that was funded through OSEP, as well as the name and number of someone to contact for more information about the program.  An example (which does not include student-specific information) follows:

 

Personnel Preparation Program Targets Low-Incidence Population

 For the past 10 years, the State of New Hampshire has been a national leader in promoting the inclusion of students with severe disabilities into regular classes in their neighborhood schools.  However, there has never been a preservice training program for special education teachers who work to support students with low-incidence disabilities, their families, and their teachers.  The state's higher education institutions have always argued that the number of teachers needed for this population of students is so small that it wouldn't be 'cost effective' to invest in the faculty or institutional infrastructure for a program that would have a difficult time being self‑supporting.

 Thanks to a Personnel Preparation grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) in the Low‑Incidence Disability category, the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire is in its second year of administering the ‘Inclusion Facilitator Training Program’ – a 20-credit, two-year graduate program that leads to state certification in low‑incidence disabilities.  Trainees in the program include a mix of full‑time graduate students and teachers working full time in the field.  The trainees take coursework related to such topics as the values and rationale for inclusion, the development of curricular and communication supports for students in regular classes, positive behavior supports, facilitating social relationships, and collaboration and systems change advocacy.

 Because of increased awareness of the importance of training of this group of special education teachers, corollary efforts are now underway to restructure the state certification to reflect recent changes in the field and current best practices, and in making the program a permanent part of the offerings at the University of New Hampshire. 

Without Congressional support of IDEA Part D dollars, the seed money for this program would not be available.  It is a perfect example of how federal dollars can be used to ‘jumpstart’ state‑level programs that benefit students with disabilities and their families.

 For more information about the program, contact its director, Cheryl M. Jorgensen, Ph.D., Director, Inclusion Facilitator Training Program, Institute on Disability, University of New Hampshire, 7 Leavitt Lane, Suite 101, Durham, NH 03824 or at [email protected], or 603/862‑4678.

 

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