Pennsylvania Federation
Council for Exceptional Children

Resolutions

Chronological Table of Resolutions

2002
Resolution Regarding the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
Resolution Supporting Professionals Seeking National Board Certification

2001
In Recognition  of the Contributions of Dr. Gertrudfe A. Barber to PFCEC, the Field of Special Education, and Exceptional Children
In Support of a More Active Role in Advocacy
Impact of High-Stakes Testing on Urban and Rural School Districts and Students with Disabilities
In Recognition of the Contributions of Carolyn Benscoter to PFCEC, the Field of Special Education, and Exceptional Children

2000
Proposed Chapter 14 Regulations: Special Education Services and Programs
TED Resolution relative to Pennsylvania Chapter 354
A Resolution to Recognize Those Who Provided Special Education Services and Support to Pennsylvania Children and Youth with Disabilities in the 20th Century

1999
Resolution to Support Proposed Chapter 14 Regulations

1998
In Support of Enactment of Chapter 16
In Support of Improved Conditions in Education for Children with Special Needs
In Memory of Our Friend and Colleague, John Wilson

1997
Resolution in Memory of Florence Weed
Professionally Recognized Special Educator Certification Program
Interim Alternative Education Programs
Clarification of IDEA Issues

1996
Inclusion of Students with Exceptionalities in Education Initiatives
Education for Students who are Gifted, II

1994
Promoting Cultural Awareness and Respect of Individual Differences
Promotion of Integrated Therapies in Education
Education for the Gifted
PFCEC Position on Inclusion
Proposed Chapter 49 Certification Changes

1993
Continuing Professional Development for All School Personnel
Contributions of Varied Professions in Life Long Learning
The Role of Families in Education
Resolution Regarding the Contributions of Nancy Anderson to PFCEC, the Field of Special Education, and Exceptional Children

1992
Equitable Distribution of Leadership Roles by Ethnicity, Gender, Profession, Disability and Geography
Managing Communicable, Contagious and Infectious Diseases

1991
Supporting Secondary Instructional Support Teams
The Impact of State Regulations and Standards
Supporting the Prohibition of Corporal Punishment
Educational Environments for Exceptional Students
Special Education Funding

1988
The Provision of Appropriate Classroom Space for All Programs for Handicapped Students in Pennsylvania

1987
Supporting the Continuum of Program Placement Options for Exceptional Children in Pennsylvania
The Integration of Students with Handicapping Conditions Into Regular Classes in Pennsylvania

1986
Supporting Certification of Teachers of Gifted Students

 

 
RESOLUTION REGARDING THE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT OF 2001

Whereas:  The No Child Left Behind Act was enacted in 2001 as the reauthorization of the ESEA Act of 1965.

Whereas:  The No Child Left Behind Act requires increased accountability from states, school districts, and schools,

Be it resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children seeks clarification on accountability (does all mean all?).

Whereas the No Child Left Behind Act identified early intervention as critical,

Be it resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children expresses its strong support in all endeavors to support early intervention.

Be it further resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children supports efforts to educate stakeholders in early intervention.

Whereas:  The No Child Left Behind Act requires ongoing student assessment, be it resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children supports review and revision of the current state mandated assessment tools to assure accurate assessment of student achievement levels,

Be it further resolved that the state mandated assessment tools used and their delivery should support instruction and student growth. 

 


RESOLUTION SUPPORTING PROFESSIONALS SEEKING NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFICATION

Whereas:  The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards was created in 1987 response to a Nation at Risk and A Nation Prepared,

Whereas:  The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards is an organization of teachers and others committed to teachers who are working to strengthen the teaching profession and to improve student learning,

Whereas:  The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan and non-governmental organization and receives support from foundations, corporations and from the United States Department of Education,

Whereas:  The mission of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards is (in part) to advance the quality of teaching and learning in all schools, and preliminary research clearly demonstrates that students taught by National Board Certified Teachers demonstrated a deeper understanding of he concepts that they were taught,

Whereas:  The Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Pennsylvania Legislature have been reluctant to support or recognize Pennsylvania teacher seeking or achieving this nationally recognized prestigious certification,

And Whereas:  In Pennsylvania, over 2,100,000 children are educated by more than 118,000 teachers and only 49 of these teachers are Board Certified, and all students in Pennsylvania deserve and need the best teachers,

Be It Resolved:  That the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children, will promote, support and applaud candidates for National Board Certification and will work with the Pennsylvania legislature and the PA Department of Education, to support and promote this opportunity for Pennsylvania teachers and to enhance educational opportunities for all Pennsylvania students. 

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IN RECOGNITION OF THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. GERTRUDE A. BARBER TO PFCEC, THE FIELD OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN

Whereas, Gertrude Barber devoted her life to improving the quality of life
for people with disabilities;

Whereas, Gertrude founded the Dr. Gertrude A. Barber Center in Erie, PA, in
1952, to provide special education and related services to students with
mental retardation and other disabilities;

Whereas, Gertrude, during her 48 years of service, established many
satellite sites throughout Pennsylvania, including group homes in the
Philadelphia and Pittsburgh areas;

Whereas, Gertrude demonstrated outstanding leadership as PFCEC President in
1955-1956 and President of ARC of Pennsylvania in 1959-1961;

Be it Resolved, that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional
Children offers recognition and sincere appreciation in the name of
thousands of individuals with disabilities, their families and countless
colleagues to whom Gertrude dedicated her entire life.
 

IN SUPPORT OF A MORE ACTIVE ROLE IN ADVOCACY

Whereas, the PFCEC, as the largest professional organization in the field of
special education within the State, is uniquely stationed to disseminate
information and influence policy regarding special education in
Pennsylvania;

Whereas, in order to create positive and effective outcomes for children and
youth with disabilities within the Commonwealth, it will be necessary for
professionals within the field of special education to become even more
assertive advocates for these children, youth, and their families;

Be it Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional
Children will actively pursue representation on local, state, and national
committees and other entities that will promote positive outcomes for
individuals with exceptionalities.

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IMPACT OF HIGH-STAKES TESTING ON URBAN AND RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Whereas, in response to federal mandates for assessment of all students,
Pennsylvania has mandated standardized testing of all students in certain
grades, including those with disabilities; and

Whereas, the results of such testing may have significant impact on schools
through mandates or economic consequences; and

Whereas, the currently designated test was not developed to accommodate the
needs of the large population of students with special needs such as those
in need of learning and/or emotional supports; and

Whereas, requiring such students to participate in such tests often results
in poor performance and emotional/behavioral difficulties due to high
anxiety; and

Whereas, the currently designated alternative test likewise is not
appropriate for these students; and

Whereas, including the scores of these students will artificially depress
the composite scores of schools with a population of students in this
category resulting in the aforementioned consequences;

Be it Resolved that while the Pennsylvania Federation Council for
Exceptional Children supports the concept of testing all students, we
encourage the Pennsylvania Department of Education, in partnership with
appropriate stakeholders, to develop an alternative test or alternative test
protocol which will fairly and more accurately assess these students and
their schools.

IN RECOGNITION OF THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF CAROLYN BENSCOTER TO PFCEC, THE FIELD OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN

Whereas, Carolyn Benscoter has devoted her life to improving the quality of
life for people with disabilities;

Whereas, Carolyn, during her 20 plus years of service, utilized technology
to enhance the educational opportunities for students with disabilities;

Whereas, Carolyn demonstrated outstanding leadership as PFCEC Division
Presidents of TAM and Pioneers;

Whereas, Carolyn and her husband, Dick Jeffreys, devoted many hours
coordinating registration at the Annual Pennsylvania Federation Council for
Exceptional Children State Convention;

Be it Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional
Children offers recognition and sincere appreciation in the name of
thousands of individuals with disabilities, their families, and countless
colleagues to whom Carolyn has dedicated her life.

Proposed Chapter 14 Regulations: Special Education Services and Programs

Whereas, Act 212 gives parents the right to withhold eligibility information from School Age Programs on students transitioning from Early Intervention Programs;

Whereas, this lack of sharing eligibility information for a student transitioning from Early Intervention Programs into School Age Programs may result in the student not receiving a free appropriate public education (FAPE);

Furthermore, the Chapter 14 regulations require School Age Programs to engage in child find efforts;

Whereas, eligibility information on students transitioning from Early Intervention Programs to School Age Programs would aid in these child find efforts;

Be it resolved, that the Pennsylvania Federation Council For Exceptional Children (PFCEC), the major professional organization of special educators, has an obligation to provide substantial input into the review of these Proposed Chapter 14 Regulations;

Be it further resolved, that PFCEC reaffirms the 1999 resolution supporting changes to the Proposed Chapter 14 regulations which align Chapter 14 with Federal Guidelines;

Be it further resolved, that the proposed changes must explicitly include and fully delineate the appropriate sharing of information between Early Intervention Programs and School Age Programs necessary to protect the students right to FAPE.

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TED Resolution relative to Pennsylvania Chapter 354

Whereas, Chapter 354 which addresses the quality of teacher education candidates and programs;

Whereas, there is no scientifically rigorous empirical research evidence suggesting that the measures incorporated in the Chapter are correlates of teacher effectiveness;

Whereas, there is empirical research demonstrating correlations between teacher education programs and effective teachers other than those mandated in the Chapter;

Whereas, the Teacher Education Division of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children does support evaluating teacher education candidates and teacher preparation programs to enhance the quality of said programs;

Whereas, this Chapter will potentially impact teacher candidates of diverse backgrounds such as low socioeconomic status, disabilities, first generation college students, and minorities;

Whereas, this Chapter will potentially impact the number of certified teacher candidates available to fill vacancies in a nationally critical need area;

Be it resolved, that the Representative Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children does not support Chapter 354 as currently mandated. It is our belief that teacher educators and their professional organizations are in the best position to determine quality performance standards for their profession.

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A Resolution to Recognize Those Who Provided Special Education Services and Support to Pennsylvania Children and Youth with Disabilities in the 20th Century

Whereas, as Pennsylvania Special Education is on the verge of the 21st century;

Whereas, Pennsylvanians took the lead in special education in the 20th century with the PARC vs. Commonwealth decision;

Whereas, providing public education and special education services for children and youth with disabilities has been a priority;

Whereas, administrators provided leadership and wisdom in directing programs and services for children and youth with disabilities in Pennsylvania;

Whereas, teachers provided daily instruction and guidance to children and youth with disabilities in Pennsylvania;

Whereas, parents provided the strength and fortitude to pursue a quality education for their children and youth with disabilities in Pennsylvania;

Whereas, educators' provided research and ongoing preparation of qualified individuals to teach Pennsylvania's children and youth with disabilities;

Whereas, support personnel provided the much need support to ensure a quality education for children and youth with disabilities;

Be it resolved, that the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children recognizes and honors those individuals that were and still are the foundation of special education in Pennsylvania;

Be it further resolved, that as special education in Pennsylvania enters the 21st century we will never forget those early years and those who made programs and services for exceptional children and youth possible;

Be it further resolved, as we move toward the next century that we continue to focus on the needs of the children and the creation of a society where all members are accepted for their unique abilities.

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A RESOLTUTION TO SUPPORT PROPOSED CHAPTER 14 REGULATIONS

Whereas,the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania State Board of Education currently seeks public comment regarding their "Draft Proposal to Revise Chapter 14 of Public Code: Special Education Regulations;

Whereas, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania State Board of Education current regulations exceed federal mandates enacted in the most recent federal legislation (IDEA) governing Special Education implementation;

Whereas, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania State Board of Education "Draft Proposal" seeks to align Commonwealth regulations with the comprehensive federal regulations (IDEA);

Whereas, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania State Board of Education's effort may meet with resistance from a variety of special interest groups who favor increasing regulations regarding special education implementation; and

Whereas, the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children (PFCEC) is the largest organization of special education professionals in the Commonwealth with over 2800 members;

Be it resolved, that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children supports the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania State Board of Education's effort to establish regulations that align with the comprehensive federal regulations (IDEA);

Be it further resolved, that board parameters regarding treating children with developmental delays not be restricted by any limiting definitions or criteria;

Be it further resolved, that PFCEC supports adoption of triennial reevaluation of eligible school-age children with disabilities, provided the PARC consent decree is maintained;

Be it further resolved, that PFCEC also supports alignment to federal regulations requiring biennial reevaluations of pre-school aged children;

Be it further resolved, that PFCEC supports local control over caseload maximums as recommended in case law protocol;

Be it further resolved, that PFCEC supports dissolution of the appellate-level hearing officers in favor of a one-tier system that defines more precisely the power of state hearing officers or administrative law judges;

Be it further resolved, that PFCEC appreciates and supports the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania State Board of Education's proposed Chapter 14 regulations.

Editor's Note: You are encouraged to copy the above resolution and mail it along with a personal comment in support to Peter Garland, PA State Board of Education, 333 Market St., Harrisburg, PA 17126.

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IN SUPPORT OF ENACTMENT OF CHAPTER 16

Whereas, the new proposed Pennsylvania State Board Chapter 16 Regulations were published on October 3, 1998 in the Pennsylvania Bulletin;

Whereas, gifted children are defined in Pennsylvania Statutes as exceptional learners who require specially designed services in order to fully develop their abilities;

Whereas, Pennsylvania has a long history of providing due process protection to gifted students;

Whereas, the proposed Chapter 16 contains no provisions for monitoring program quality;

Whereas, the proposed Chapter 16 fails to define professional practices in gifted programming and class sizes which would ensure attention to individual needs;

Be it resolved, That the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children supports enactment of Chapter 16 while encouraging action to preserve commitment to implementing and monitoring quality programming to meet the needs of individual gifted students.

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IN SUPPORT OF IMPROVED CONDITIONS IN EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Whereas, children with special needs require support for their learning, and should receive their support from educators who have been trained in professional practice standards, who support their students learning regardless of the resources or support available to them and who demonstrate a commitment to continuing their education and increasing their skills;

Whereas, educators of children with special needs often work under conditions that inhibit the use of professional practice standards;

Be it resolved, that the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children expresses strong support for improved conditions in the education of children with special needs;

Be it further resolved, that the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation Council of Exceptional Children expresses strong support for the work The Council for Exceptional Children is doing to improve conditions in the education of students with special needs;

Be it further resolved, that the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children expresses support for affording all educators of children with special needs the training, time, space, resources, support and respect needed to fulfill professional practice standards as established by the Council for Exceptional Children.

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IN MEMORY OF OUR FRIEND AND COLLEAGUE, JOHN WILSON

Whereas, John offered endless support to children with special needs;

Whereas, John offered endless support to teachers of children with special needs;

Whereas, John offered endless support to organizations on behalf of children with special needs;

Whereas, John was a well respected leader, mentor, colleague, and friend;

Whereas, John's professional life was spent working toward the benefit of children with special needs and making outstanding contributions to the field of special education;

Whereas, John provided years of active leadership and support at the local, state and national level to the Council for Exceptional Children, Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children, Pennsylvania Student Council for Exceptional Children, the Delaware County Chapter #184 of the Council for Exceptional Children and was one of Pennsylvania's charter Pioneer Division members;

Whereas, John was committed to preserving the history and tradition of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children;

Be it resolved, that the Executive Board of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children offers its deepest appreciation to a friend of children with special needs and our honored colleague, John Wilson.

Be it further resolved, that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children will change the name of the "Award of Excellence" to the "John Wilson Award of Excellence" beginning at the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children 1999 Convention. This award is given to the person or organization who has continued to strive for excellence in the area of exceptionalities. John Wilson spent the majority of his life promoting excellence for all individuals.

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IN MEMORY OF OUR FRIEND AND COLLEAGUE, FLORENCE W. WEED

Whereas, Florence tirelessly offered her encouragement and support to her students and teachers;

Whereas, Florence offered her leadership in supporting various PFCEC Chapters, including the reorganized Pocono Chapter (620) of CEC as Region V Director;

Whereas, Florence helped to establish model programs and services for students with emotional disturbances, including the Alternative High School for Adolescents with Emotional Disturbance;

Whereas, Florence served actively for many years on the Pennsylvaina Federation Council for Exceptional Children Executive Board;

Whereas, Florence modeled honesty, integrity, professionalism in all her endeavors;

Whereas, Florence volunteered her work and leadership to numerous organizations, including the American Association of University Women, the Sun Inn Preservation Society, Dickinson University Alumni Council, and the Children with Attention Deficit Disorder organization;

Be it resolved, that the Executive Board of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children offers its deepest appreciation to a friend of exceptional children and our honored colleague,Florence W. Weed

You are missed Flo.

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PROFESSIONALLY RECOGNIZED SPECIAL EDUCATOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

Whereas, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania was an active force in generating the PARC Consent Decree which was instrumental in the later passage of P.L. 94-142; and

Whereas, the Pennsylvania Teacher Education Division supports the mission, training, and practices of the Council for Exceptional Children's professional standards for beginning teachers in special education; and

Whereas, Pennsylvania has consistently demonstrated its ability to produce highly trained professionals resulting in numerous recognitions such as the National Clarissa Hug Teacher of the Year, the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children Teacher of the Year, in addition to regional and local honors; and

Whereas, a national certification program reinforces the belief that the field of special education produces talented and qualified professionals;

Be it resolved that, the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children expresses its strong support for the Council for Exceptional Children's Professionally Recognized Special Educator certification program and encourages members to obtain this honored credential.

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INTERIM ALTERNATIVE PLACEMENT PROGRAMS

Whereas, the reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in some conditions allows for the unilateral removal of students with disabilities to "interim alternative education programs";

Be it resolved that, the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children expresses the need for standards in state Chapter 14 regulations for the interim alternative education programs that are at least on par with the educational programs available in schools.

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CLARIFICATION OF IDEA ISSUES

Whereas, the Congress and President of the United States have again demonstrated bipartisan goodwill toward students with disabilities through the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA);

Be it resolved that, the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children expresses its gratitude to Congress and the President of the United States for their enduring efforts on behalf of the education of students with disabilities;

Be it further resolved that, the Delegate Assembly of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children expresses the need to have the U.S. Department of Education:

bulletclarify through definition in the regulations the term "general curriculum";
bulletclarify in the regulations the nature and extent of general educator participation in the IEP process;
bulletprovide clear guidelines for states to develop "alternative statewide assessments;
bulletrequire that SEA's include standards in state plans for interim alternative educational programs, as well as, alternative education programs;
bulletclarify the implications of various state mandated "prereferral" options related the the IDEA;

Be it further resolved that PFCEC expresses its strong and continuing support of the need for the full continuum of programs.

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SUPPORTING OF INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH EXCEPTIONALITIES IN EDUCATION INITIATIVES

Whereas, students with exceptionalities are entitled to a free appropriate public education and to participate fully in the opportunities provided by public schools;

Whereas, the needs of students with exceptionalities should be addressed systemically in all educational initiatives of the Administration, the of Department of Education, and the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania;

Be it resolved, that the Executive Board of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children will monitor the educational initiatives to ensure that the needs of students with exceptionalities are addressed; Be it further resolved, that the Executive Board of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children will actively communicate the intent of this resolution to their government representatives; and, that the membership of the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children are encouraged to communicate the intent of this resolution to their governmental representatives. November 1996

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EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE GIFTED, II

Whereas, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania historically has been a national leader in providing services to students who are gifted,

Whereas, clarifying the concepts and regulations related to students who are gifted is valid,

Whereas, the strength of the regulations for children with exceptionalities lies with safeguards encouraging the active participation of parents.

Be it resolved that any new regulations or standards should maintain at least the same level of leadership, commitment, and services that Pennsylvania has historically demonstrated toward students who are gifted. November 1996

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PROMOTING CULTURAL AWARENESS AND RESPECT OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES

Whereas American Society as a whole is highly diverse and reflects the unique as well as shared histories, cultures and values of many groups represented by age, gender, religion, race, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and differing abilities, and

Whereas children and youth learn best when their educational experiences are relevant to their own personal life experiences, and when they feel valued and important as individual learners, and

Whereas it is the responsibility of the American education system to help individuals develop a positive self image as well as an appreciation of differences and diversity in others in order to become responsible, contributing members of their community,

Be It Resolved that the PFCEC will work to promote cultural awareness and respect of individual differences by: - Recruiting members and leaders from diverse backgrounds and developing policies which reflect cultural awareness and appreciation throughout its organization. - Advocating for the appropriate use of validated, non-biased evaluation tools and procedures to avoid over-identification or inappropriate placement of minorities in special education programs. - Promoting instructional practices based on use of culturally diverse and anti-bias curricular materials; and, - Maintaining high standards of professional ethics which espouse respect for the individual civil rights of all children, youth and adults. November 1994

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PROMOTION OF INTEGRATED THERAPIES IN EDUCATION

Whereas many children and youth who are identified as in need of special education services also exhibit differing abilities in communication, sensory, physical and/or adaptive domains, and

Whereas specific differing abilities in these domains often impact on an individual's overall development and ability to benefit fully from instruction or intervention alone, and

Whereas children and youth, particularly those with special needs, learn best when learning experiences are multi-sensory and linked to previous or other relevant learning through coordinated multi-disciplinary programs and approaches,

Be It Resolved that the PFCEC supports the use of integrated therapies in educational programs so that speech/language pathologists, physical and occupational therapists, and other related service personnel who work with parents, students and classroom teachers to assess child needs, develop and evaluate individual service or educational programs, and routinely implement daily programs in the context of and within settings for intervention and instruction. November 1994

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EDUCATION FOR THE GIFTED

Whereas programming for the gifted in American education presents a "quiet crisis," and in that this term accurately reflects the fact that children and youth with gifts, despite their unique educational needs, often will not openly exhibit behaviors which create concern or elicit intervention on the part of teachers if these needs are not met, and

Whereas issues have arisen in light of the current movement toward inclusion of all children and youth in regular educational settings, including those with gifts, and as a result, responsibilities of regular classroom teachers have subsequently increased and expanded,

Be It Resolved that the PFCEC will insist that Pennsylvania develop and adapt teacher training and support programs so that differentiated programming will be designed and appropriately implemented in all settings to meet the particular needs of each individual learner with gifts in every school system in our State. November 1994

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PFCEC POSITION ON INCLUSION

Whereas inclusion has become a significant force in the educational reform movement in our state and nation, and

Whereas, in order for the unification of special and regular education in the State of Pennsylvania to create positive and effective outcomes for children and youth with differing abilities within the Commonwealth, it will be necessary for professionals within the field of special education to become even more assertive advocates for these children, youth and their families in order to assure the individual needs of all learners are met, and

Whereas, the PFCEC, as the largest professional organization in the field within the State, is uniquely stationed to disseminate information and influence policy regarding special education in Pennsylvania,

Be It Resolved that PFCEC will, during the 1994-95 program year: - Develop a position on inclusion within Pennsylvania by reviewing position statements previously issued by National CEC, other CEC sub-divisions and other appropriate entities; and, - Disseminate, on a regular basis through its newsletter and other appropriate means, timely information regarding quality practices for inclusive programming to its members and other organizations for regular educators. November 1994

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PROPOSED CHAPTER 49 CERTIFICATION CHANGES

Whereas all education personnel must be able to demonstrate competence in addressing the increasingly diverse learning needs and characteristics of children and youth, and

Whereas research has demonstrated the need for and efficacy of on-going cross- disciplinary problem-solving and teaching, and

Whereas this competency must include the ability to effectively collaborate with professional colleagues from a variety of disciplines and families, and

Whereas regular and special educators have shared as well as distinct areas of competence and skill that complement each other and enhance the learning of diverse groups of students,

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation of the Council for Exceptional Children (PFCEC) supports the following concepts related to certification contained in proposed changes to Chapter 49: - Performance-based standards - Age/developmental categories - On-going professional development and renewable certification requirements.

Be It Further Resolved that the proposed changes must explicitly include and fully delineate the professional standards for special educators before any further action or approval of Chapter 49 by the State Board of Education.

Be It Further Resolved that PFCEC, as the major professional organization of special educators, has the obligation to provide substantial input into the development of these standards, and that the State Board of Education and the Department of Education have a public responsibility to seek such input from PFCEC. November 1993

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CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR ALL SCHOOL PERSONNEL

Whereas the field of special education is rapidly changing and professional roles are being redefined, and

Whereas PFCEC believes in the continuing professional development of administrators, teachers and other professional school personnel.

Be It Resolved that the PFCEC Executive Board will strive to develop networking opportunities, collaborative efforts and information dissemination to assist in the overall professional development of its members. November 1993

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CONTRIBUTIONS OF VARIED PROFESSIONS IN LIFE LONG LEARNING

Whereas learning is a life long process from... Infancy when a baby initially interacts with and bonds with a caregiver, to Early Childhood when play becomes a catalyst of growth and development, to School-Age when knowledge and skills refine the personality as well as one's abilities to live successfully, to Adulthood when life experiences continue to help one build new understandings as each new challenge arises,

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children will seek to recognize, respect and educate the public about the contributions of all professions working to enhance a child's growth, development and learning over the life span, from child care providers and early interventionists to classroom teachers to vocational instructors and college professors. November 1993

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THE ROLE OF FAMILIES IN EDUCATION

Whereas one's earliest learning experiences and most critical relationships are created within families,

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children will seek to understand, promote and advocate for the causes of families in our State's educational community to: Encourage the existence of effective family systems; Recognize the diversity of cultures and family values in our society; and Facilitate parent and professional partnership through community networking in our daily work with children and families. November 1993

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RESOLUTION REGARDING THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF NANCY ANDERSON TO PFCEC, THE FIELD OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN

Whereas Nancy Anderson has served as a member, innovator and leader to the Council for Exceptional Children for over twenty-five years. Tirelessly encouraging college students, teachers, administrators, psychologists, psychiatrists and social workers to heighten their level of professionalism by joining CEC, and

Whereas she established model programs for the education of socially and emotionally disturbed children. Forming Multi-disciplinary Teams, she demonstrated the effectiveness of psychotherapy and positive reinforcement for appropriate behavior as complementary intervention methods. Nancy worked tirelessly in Montgomery County, Harrisburg and Washington, D.C., and

Whereas she has demonstrated outstanding leadership as PFCEC President in 1982-1983 and Governing Board Member from 1984-1988. Nancy used her fiscal management skills as treasurer of the Pioneer Division for International CEC and wrote the constitution for PFCEC Pioneer Division. As an honest, articulate and committed leader, she inspired a loyal staff to achieve a higher level of professionalism, in special education, by touching the hearts of exceptional children.

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children offers recognition and appreciation in the name of thousands of children, parents and countless professionals to whom Nancy has dedicated her entire life. November, 1993

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EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION OF LEADERSHIP ROLES BY ETHNICITY, GENDER, PROFESSION, DISABILITY AND GEOGRAPHY

Whereas the Council for Exceptional Children reported in a survey taken that 51% of the membership was special education teachers, and

Whereas the membership across PFCEC standing committees and the Executive Board is not representative in the areas of ethnicity, gender, profession, disability and geography,

Be It Resolved that the PFCEC Executive Board devise a plan to improve these conditions and report to the 1993 Delegate Assembly on ways to improve the conditions listed herein. November 1992

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MANAGING COMMUNICABLE, CONTAGIOUS AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Whereas recent public awareness of chronic infectious diseases such as hepatitis B-virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus and HIV have raised concerns necessitating the reassessment, or at least clarification, of educational program and school policies and procedures, and

Whereas some special education personnel may come in close contact with students who may have a contagious, communicable or infectious disease, therefore

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children supports the development of educational program and school policies which provide educational personnel with adequate training and protection for themselves and their families if they are exposed to such diseases through their employment and which enable educational personnel who are medically at high risk to work in environments which minimize such risk. November 1992

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SUPPORTING SECONDARY INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT TEAMS

The Federation recommends the immediate development of an Instructional Support Team process at the secondary level to support students who can benefit from this process. Some students require structured support throughout their school years in order to benefit from regular education programs. November 1991

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THE IMPACT OF STATE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS

The Federation urges the Secretary of Education and the Pennsylvania Department of Education to conduct an in-depth review of the impact (such as time lines, paperwork required, teachers' time away from students for the MDT/IEP process, etc.) of the implementation of the special education regulations and standards on students, parents, teachers and administrators. November 1991

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SUPPORTING THE PROHIBITION OF CORPORAL PUNISHMENT

The Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children supports the prohibition of the use of corporal punishment in special education. Corporal punishment is here defined as a situation in which all of the following elements are present: An authority accuses a child of violating a rule and seeks from the child an explanation, whereupon a judgment of guilt is made, followed by physical contact and pain inflicted upon the child. The Federation finds no conditions under which corporal punishment so defined would be the treatment of choice in special education. November 1991

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EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS

The Federation believes that children in need of specially designed instruction should be taught in regular classes and local schools of residence insofar as, at these locations, the students' IEP's can be implemented. The Federation also believes that the goal of educating exceptional children with non-exceptional children is desirable if the individual program is such that it will enhance the exceptional child's educational, social, emotional and vocational development. November 1991

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SPECIAL EDUCATION FUNDING

The Federation strongly recommends that the administration and the General Assembly deal with the issue of future funding of special education as early as possible in order to assist school districts, approved private schools and intermediate units with long range planning. This funding plan should be for more than one year and must adequately meet the unique needs of exceptional students in the Commonwealth. November 1991

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THE PROVISION OF APPROPRIATE CLASSROOM SPACE FOR ALL PROGRAMS FOR HANDICAPPED STUDENTS IN PENNSYLVANIA

Whereas programs and classes for handicapped students require appropriate space in which to function, and

Whereas present state regulations and standards do not require school districts to provide necessary and adequate classrooms for special education programs, and

Whereas many classes for handicapped students are in substandard rooms, and

Whereas each year classes for the handicapped are forced to move to other locations to allow for regular education classes,

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children announces its support for state laws, regulations and standards requiring local school districts to provide adequate and appropriate class space to all special education programs. October 1988

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SUPPORTING THE CONTINUUM OF PROGRAM PLACEMENT OPTIONS FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN IN PENNSYLVANIA

Whereas both Federal and State regulations regarding appropriate education for handicapped students require the maintenance of a continuum of education placement options, and

Whereas handicapped students and their parents in Pennsylvania have relied upon a wide and varied range and choice of both public and private sector placement options, and

Whereas Federal and State regulations require that special education placement decisions be based upon the unique and individual needs of each student requiring a program and related service in special education,

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children announces its support to retain the choice of both public and private placements that makes available a full continuum of placement options and facilitates comprehensive and appropriate programs tailored to meet the specific needs of each handicapped student in Pennsylvania. October 1987

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THE INTEGRATION OF STUDENT WITH HANDICAPPING CONDITIONS INTO REGULAR CLASSES IN PENNSYLVANIA

Whereas PFCEC advocates that students with handicapping conditions should be placed in the least restrictive environment depending upon the individual needs of each student, and

Whereas the Pennsylvania Department of Education is encouraging integration of students with handicapping conditions into regular classes, and

Whereas model programs and initiatives for the integration of students with handicapping conditions have been funded by the State,

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children support integration programs for students with handicapping conditions which have been thoroughly studied and have been determined to be appropriate and effective, and

Be It Further Resolved that such programs should provide the necessary special education services and support to the students, as well as to regular education personnel. October 1987

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SUPPORTING CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS OF GIFTED STUDENTS

Whereas the education of gifted students is a special area of educating exceptional students, and

Whereas teachers of the gifted require skills, education and training beyond what is required to teach regular education, and

Whereas, at present, there are no specific certification requirements to teach gifted students in Pennsylvania, except certification require to teach in basic education,

Be It Resolved that the Pennsylvania Federation Council for Exceptional Children supports the development of a separate special certificate to teach gifted students in Pennsylvania. October 1986


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